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Population

Philip M. Hauser
American Journal of Sociology
Vol. 47, No. 6 (May, 1942), pp. 816-828
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2770088
Page Count: 13
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Population
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Abstract

Between 1930 and 1940 the population growth of the nation declined markedly with the disappearance of net foreign immigration and with continued decline in natural increase. The decrease in the rate of growth of population in the South was less than that in the North of the West. The balance of age-specific birth and death rates shifted so as to fall below the critical point of population replacement. The rate of urban growth decline greatly, to a point barely exceeding that of rural growth, while the rural-farm population remained practically stationary and the rural-nonfarm population increased relatively rapidly. Metropolitan districts continued to grow more rapidly in outlying areas than in central cities. The population of the nation continued to age, decline somewhat in sex ratio, but changed very little in racial composition. The number and proportion of foreign-born white persons in the United States decreased substantially.

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