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Morality, Consumerism and the Internal Market in Health Care

Tom Sorell and Tom Sorrell
Journal of Medical Ethics
Vol. 23, No. 2 (Apr., 1997), pp. 71-76
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27717898
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Morality, Consumerism and the Internal Market in Health Care
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Abstract

Unlike the managerially oriented reforms that have brought auditing and accounting into such prominence in the UK National Health Service (NHS), and which seem alien to the culture of the caring professions, consumerist reforms may seem to complement moves towards the acceptance of wide definitions of health, and towards increasing patient autonomy. The empowerment favoured by those who support patient autonomy sounds like the sort of empowerment that is sometimes associated with the patient's charter. For this reason moral criticism of recent NHS reforms may stop short of calling consumerism into question. This, however, would be a mistake: consumerism can be objectionable both within and beyond the health care market.

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