Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Relationship of Literature and Society

Milton C. Albrecht
American Journal of Sociology
Vol. 59, No. 5 (Mar., 1954), pp. 425-436
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2772244
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Relationship of Literature and Society
Preview not available

Abstract

In most theories of the relationship of literature and society reflection, influence, and social control are implied. Literature is interpreted as reflecting norms and values, as revealing the ethos of culture, the processes of class struggle, and certain types of social "facts." "Influence" is not strickly the reverse of reflection, since social stability and cultural ideals are involved. Social control, however, articulates closely with one version of reflection, though to a limited extent in complex, dynamic societies.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425
  • Thumbnail: Page 
426
    426
  • Thumbnail: Page 
427
    427
  • Thumbnail: Page 
428
    428
  • Thumbnail: Page 
429
    429
  • Thumbnail: Page 
430
    430
  • Thumbnail: Page 
431
    431
  • Thumbnail: Page 
432
    432
  • Thumbnail: Page 
433
    433
  • Thumbnail: Page 
434
    434
  • Thumbnail: Page 
435
    435
  • Thumbnail: Page 
436
    436