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Residential Distribution and Occupational Stratification

Otis Dudley Duncan and Beverly Duncan
American Journal of Sociology
Vol. 60, No. 5, World Urbanism (Mar., 1955), pp. 493-503
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2772537
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Residential Distribution and Occupational Stratification
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Abstract

Ecological analysis is a promising approach to the study of urban social stratification, for differences in the residential distributions of occupations groups are found to parallel the differences among them in socio-economic status and recruitment. The occupation groups at the extremes of the socioeconomic scale are the most segregated. Residential concentration in low-rent areas and residential centralization are inversely related to socioeconomic status. Inconsistencies in the ranking of occupation groups according to residential patterns occur at points where there is evidence of status disequilibrium.

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