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Economic Deprivation and Extremism: A Study of Unemployed Negroes

David Street and John C. Leggett
American Journal of Sociology
Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jul., 1961), pp. 53-57
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2772957
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Economic Deprivation and Extremism: A Study of Unemployed Negroes
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Abstract

A study of two Negro neighborhoods and several white and Negro natural areas in an industrial community gives preliminary support to the proposition that groups hard hit by economic deprivation will come to view violence as a plausible concomitant of economic depression. These expectations are more frequent when deprivation increases for the whole community and when respondent have radical views on governmental intervention in the economy and are unemployed themselves. The form of violence anticipated appears to be related to the pattern of political organization of the neighborhood group.

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