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Exposure to Carbon Monoxide and Nitrogen Dioxide in Enclosed Ice Arenas

T. W. Pelham, L. E. Holt and M. A. Moss
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Vol. 59, No. 4 (Apr., 2002), pp. 224-233
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27731667
Page Count: 10
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Exposure to Carbon Monoxide and Nitrogen Dioxide in Enclosed Ice Arenas
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Abstract

This article summarises the latest information on the adverse cardiorespiratory effects of exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in enclosed ice rinks. Sources of CO and NO2 emissions are identified, current standards for these agents, as well as methods of controlling the emissions, dispersion, and evacuation of these toxic gases are presented. A detailed literature search involving 72 references in English and French from research conducted in North America and Europe was used. Material was from peer reviewed journals and other appropriate sources. Air pollutants such as carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) which are present in enclosed skating facilities, may exacerbate a pre-existing pathogenic condition in those people who spend considerable time in these environments. Considering the popularity of ice hockey, short track speed skating, and figure skating, and the hundreds of hours that a sensitive person may spend each year in these environments, it would seem appropriate to seek more definitive answers to this important health problem. From the findings and conclusions of the research reviewed in this paper, 10 recommendations are listed.

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