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A Higher Risk of Congenital Anomalies in the Offspring of Personnel Who Served Aboard a Norwegian Missile Torpedo Boat

N. Mageroy, O. J. Mollerlokken, T. Riise, V. Koefoed and B. E. Moen
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Vol. 63, No. 2 (Feb., 2006), pp. 92-97
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27732678
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Higher Risk of Congenital Anomalies in the Offspring of Personnel Who Served Aboard a Norwegian Missile Torpedo Boat
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Abstract

Background: In the 1990s, congenital anomalies were reported among children whose fathers had served aboard a Norwegian missile torpedo boat (MTB). The Royal Norwegian Navy asked the University of Bergen to look into this problem as one part of a general health and work environment surveillance. Aims: To estimate any increased risk of having children with congenital anomalies and having stillborn children among the offspring of workers that had served aboard the MTB and to investigate possible differences in exposure and other risk factors between these groups. Methods: Data from a cross-sectional study among all current employees of the Norwegian Navy (n=2265, response rate 58%) were analysed. Results: The prevalence ratio of having a child with congenital malformations associated with working on the ship was 4.0 (95% CI 1.9 to 8.6). The prevalence ratio of having a child who was stillborn or died within one week was 4.1 (95% CI 1.7 to 9.9). Conclusion: Service aboard the MTB was associated with an increased risk of having children with congenital birth defects and having children that were stillborn. The causes of these findings are unknown.

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