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Soames on Russell's Logic: A Reply

Michael Kremer
Philosophical Studies: An International Journal for Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition
Vol. 139, No. 2 (May, 2008), pp. 209-212
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27734255
Page Count: 4
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Soames on Russell's Logic: A Reply
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Abstract

In "What is History For?," Scott Soames responds to criticisms of his treatment of Russell's logic in volume 1 of his "Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century." This note rebuts two of Soames's replies, showing that a first-order presentation of Russell's logic does not fit the argument of the "Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy," and that Soames's contextual definition of classes does not match Russell's contextual definition of classes. In consequence, Soames's presentation of Russell's logic misrepresents what Russell took to be its technical achievement and its philosophical significance.

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