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Impact of Emotional Intelligence and Other Factors on Perception of Ethical Behavior of Peers

Jacob Joseph, Kevin Berry and Satish P. Deshpande
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 89, No. 4 (Nov., 2009), pp. 539-546
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27735210
Page Count: 8
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Impact of Emotional Intelligence and Other Factors on Perception of Ethical Behavior of Peers
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Abstract

This study investigates factors impacting perceptions of ethical conduct of peers of 293 students in four US universities. Self-reported ethical behavior and recognition of emotions in others (a dimension of emotional intelligence) impacted perception of ethical behavior of peers. None of the other dimensions of emotional intelligence were significant. Age, Race, Sex, GPA, or type of major (business versus nonbusiness) did not impact perception of ethical behavior of peers. Implications of the results of the study for business schools and industry professionals are discussed.

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