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Poetry and Film in Postmodern Spain: The Case of Pedro Almodóvar and Ana Rossetti

Jill Kruger-Robbins
Anales de la literatura española contemporánea
Vol. 22, No. 1/2 (1997), pp. 165-179
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27741354
Page Count: 15
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Poetry and Film in Postmodern Spain: The Case of Pedro Almodóvar and Ana Rossetti
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Abstract

After the late 1960s there is an increased affinity between cinema and poetry, as all genres discard objectivity, continuity, and "direct" representation as illusions in the service of authority and begin to foreground their own artificiality as a means of questioning the absolute ground of social and cultural authority. Poet Ana Rossetti (b. 1950) and director Pedro Almodóvar (b. 1949) reflect this aesthetic shift, incorporating into their works many of the techniques of their immediate predecessors. In contrast to the novísimos, however, Rossetti and Almodóvar focus explicitly on sexuality and gender, which they simulate in their works, exposing the ways in which authors and directors use certain signifiers— including language, body images, and actors—to create simulacra and stimulate desire. As they present the eroticized body as a coded construction of ambiguous gender, Rossetti and Almodóvar heighten our awareness of the artificiality of the gendered and heterosexual erotic stimulus and thus seduce us away from accepted interpretations of gender and desire.

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