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Freedom of Speech and Philosophy of Education

Roy Harris
British Journal of Educational Studies
Vol. 57, No. 2, Academic Freedom (Jun., 2009), pp. 111-126
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27742697
Page Count: 16
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Freedom of Speech and Philosophy of Education
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Abstract

Why is freedom of speech so seldom raised as an issue in philosophy of education? In assessing this question, it is important to distinguish (i) between a freedom and its exercise, and (ii) between different philosophies of education. Western philosophies of education may be broadly divided into classes derived from theories of knowledge first articulated in ancient Greece. Freedom of speech is in principle inimical to some of these, while being essential to the objectives of others.

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