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Academic Freedom: Its Nature, Extent and Value

Robin Barrow
British Journal of Educational Studies
Vol. 57, No. 2, Academic Freedom (Jun., 2009), pp. 178-190
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27742701
Page Count: 13
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Academic Freedom: Its Nature, Extent and Value
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Abstract

Academic freedom does not refer to freedom to engage in any speech act, but to freedom to hold any belief and espouse it in an appropriately academic manner. This freedom belongs to certain institutions, rather than to individuals, because of their academic nature. Academic freedom should be absolute, regardless of any offence it may on occasion cause.

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