Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Testing Phylogeographic Hypotheses in a Euro-Siberian Cold-Adapted Leaf Beetle with Coalescent Simulations

Patrick Mardulyn, Yuri E. Mikhailov and Jacques M. Pasteels
Evolution
Vol. 63, No. 10 (Oct., 2009), pp. 2717-2729
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27743427
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Testing Phylogeographic Hypotheses in a Euro-Siberian Cold-Adapted Leaf Beetle with Coalescent Simulations
Preview not available

Abstract

Few studies to date have investigated the impact of Pleistocene climatic oscillations on the genetic diversity of cold-adapted species. We focus on the geographic distribution of genetic diversity in a Euro-Siberian boreo-montane leaf beetle, Gonioctena pallida. We present the molecular variation from three independent gene fragments over the entire geographic range of this insect. The observed sequence variation identifies a genetic diversity hot spot in the Carpathian Mountains, in central Europe, which reveals the presence of (1) an ancestral refuge population or (2) a secondary contact zone in this area. Modeling of population evolution in a coalescent framework allowed us to favor the ancestral refuge hypothesis. These analyses suggest that the Carpathian Mountains served as a refuge for G. pallida, whereas the rest of the species distribution, that spans a large portion of Europe and Asia, experienced a dramatic reduction in genetic variation probably associated to bottlenecks and/or founder events. We estimated the time of isolation of the ancestral refuge population, using an approximate Bayesian method, to be larger than 90,000 years. If true, the current pattern of genetic variation in this cold-adapted organism was shaped by a climatic event predating by far the end of the last ice age.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
2717
    2717
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2718
    2718
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2719
    2719
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2720
    2720
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2721
    2721
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2722
    2722
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2723
    2723
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2724
    2724
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2725
    2725
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2726
    2726
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2727
    2727
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2728
    2728
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2729
    2729