Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

National Context, Family Satisfaction, and Fairness in the Division of Household Labor

Theodore N. Greenstein and Jay Teachman
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 71, No. 4 (Nov., 2009), pp. 1039-1051
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27752517
Page Count: 13
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
National Context, Family Satisfaction, and Fairness in the Division of Household Labor
Preview not available

Abstract

This study uses data from married women in 30 nations to examine justice processes involving perceptions of fairness of the division of household labor and satisfaction with family life. Relative deprivation theory suggests that national context—operationalized here as nation-level gender equity—might serve as a comparative referent used by married women when making determinations of the fairness of the division of household labor. Multilevel analyses confirm that the effect of inequalities in the division of household labor on perceptions of fairness is moderated by national context, as is the effect of perceptions of fairness on satisfaction with family life. The effects are strongest in nations with high levels of gender equity, confirming two hypotheses suggested by relative deprivation theory.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1039
    1039
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1040
    1040
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1041
    1041
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1042
    1042
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1043
    1043
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1044
    1044
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1045
    1045
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1046
    1046
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1047
    1047
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1048
    1048
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1049
    1049
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1050
    1050
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1051
    1051