Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Juden als Virtuosen: Eine Studie zur Sozialgeschichte der Musik sowie zur Wirkmächtigkeit einer Denkfigur des 19. Jahrhunderts

DANIEL JÜTTE
Archiv für Musikwissenschaft
66. Jahrg., H. 2. (2009), pp. 127-154
Published by: Franz Steiner Verlag
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27764445
Page Count: 28
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($32.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Juden als Virtuosen: Eine Studie zur Sozialgeschichte der Musik sowie zur Wirkmächtigkeit einer Denkfigur des 19. Jahrhunderts
Preview not available

Abstract

The starting point of the article is Friedrich Nietzsche's aphoristic label "Virtuosos (Jews)." An initial social history of Jewish virtuosos from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries reveals that a genuine "ideal of virtuosity" existed among the German-Jewish bourgeoisie in the first half of the nineteenth century, and that Jewish virtuosos of the time played an important role in contemporary music culture. Since this evidence does not sufficiently explain Nietzsche's observation, the article explores the discourse on the idea of (Jewish) virtuosity at that time. It becomes clear that the negative connotations of the term "Jewish virtuoso" together with a number of related code words significantly shaped the typology of the virtuoso. The Jewish virtuoso became a symbol for music's alleged commercialization and was thus taken to be responsible for profound transformational processes in the marketing of music. The author suggests that the emergence of an increasingly negative view toward virtuosity is a nineteenth-century example of the diffusion of aesthetic judgement and extra-musical criteria which, to some extent, continues to today.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[127]
    [127]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
128
    128
  • Thumbnail: Page 
129
    129
  • Thumbnail: Page 
130
    130
  • Thumbnail: Page 
131
    131
  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141
  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
143
    143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154