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Industrial Development and Commitment of the Indian Industrial Worker

Vijaya Punekar and E. Hari Babu
Indian Journal of Industrial Relations
Vol. 14, No. 2 (Oct., 1978), pp. 233-240
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27765714
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Industrial Development and Commitment of the Indian Industrial Worker
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Abstract

Commitment is a value-laden concept. Earlier studies of the commitment of the Indian industrial worker ignore this value component of commitment. What they discuss under commitment is actually the adjustment of the industrial worker to the industrial employment and/or industrial way of life. The authors, therefore, examine the concept and identify its components, namely, intrinsic value of performance and discipline. The correlates of commitment are (i) adjustment to industrial employment and life, and (ii) the other-regarding sentiment, whose specific form in the industrial worker's context might be mistakenly identified with loyalty to the employer. A committed worker in the above sense performs his role to his own satisfaction. A worker who is not committed but has one of the correlates has the same outward behaviour, but he performs his job to the satisfaction of the employer and the motivation is economic rather than self-satisfaction. The authors try to show why the Indian worker prefers industrial employment and continues in it. The authors conclude that intrinsic commitment is necessary for industrial development, or more generally for any aspect of national development, but in Indian situation, it is likely to be absent. However, in its absence promotion of adjustment factors is the second best alternative.

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