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Role Stress in the Indian Industry: A Study of Banking Organisations

Farooq A. Shah
Indian Journal of Industrial Relations
Vol. 38, No. 3 (Jan., 2003), pp. 281-296
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27767849
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Role Stress in the Indian Industry: A Study of Banking Organisations
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Abstract

With the growing recognition of the 'Human Relations Approach' in the management of organisations, the discomforts and dishonours associated with work are apparently missing today but the intangible vulnerability and hazards in the shape of stress, strain and anxiety are still ingrained in it. This intrinsic and hidden susceptibility, which is more precarious and has been covertly taking the toll on working people, is a fallout of the worker and work environment misfit. Consequently, job stress has been a fascinating field of research during the recent years. However, the studies have mostly focused on its few dimensions only thereby ignoring the other equally potent constructs. The present study has been undertaken to provide an adequate explanation of stress; its nature, dimensions, causes, manifestations and coping up strategies. The study, conducted in the banking industry in Kashmir, reveals that most of the employees experience medium to high level of stress at work. Role stagnation, inadequacy of role authority and role erosion are comparatively high rated dimensions of job stress. The study further reveals that employees belonging to the clerical cadre relatively experience more stress on most of the dimensions. The available literature on the subject has been critically reviewed and various measures to effectively manage stress experience at the job have been suggested.

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