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Evolution of Synthyris sect. Dissecta (Plantaginaceae) on sky islands in the Northern Rocky Mountains

K. Marlowe and Larry Hufford
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 95, No. 3 (March 2008), pp. 381-392
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27793035
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Evolution of Synthyris sect. Dissecta (Plantaginaceae) on sky islands in the Northern Rocky Mountains
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Abstract

We examined the phylogeography of Synthyris sect. Dissecta (Plantaginaceae), which is restricted to the Olympic (S. lanuginosa) and Northern Rocky Mountains (S. dissecta and S. canbyi), to infer effects of sky islands and modes of speciation. Sequences of cpDNA trnT-trnL and psbA-trnH intergenic spacers resolved 22 haplotypes among 185 individuals sampled from 16 populations of the three species. Gene flow in the ancestral lineage and random capture of haplotypes in species lineages of sect. Dissecta have resulted in haplotype clades that are not exclusive to species. Nested clade analysis (NCA) indicates that allopatric fragmentation separated Olympic and Northern Rocky Mountain populations, giving rise to the Olympic endemic S. lanuginosa, which is characterized by unique haplotypes consistent with long temporal isolation. Low haplotype and nucleotide diversity in S. canbyi are consistent with newly founded populations experiencing a bottleneck. Furthermore, we infer S. canbyi evolved as a peripheral isolate of S. dissecta. NCA indicated limited migration in S. dissecta with possible isolation by distance. Both isolation on interglacial sky islands and valley glaciers during at least the last glaciation limited gene flow among populations of S. dissecta in different ranges of the Northern Rocky Mountains.

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