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Journal Article

Personality and Political Attitudes: Relationships across Issue Domains and Political Contexts

ALAN S. GERBER, GREGORY A. HUBER, DAVID DOHERTY, CONOR M. DOWLING and SHANG E. HA
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 104, No. 1 (February 2010), pp. 111-133
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27798542
Page Count: 23
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Personality and Political Attitudes: Relationships across Issue Domains and Political Contexts
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Abstract

Previous research on personality traits and political attitudes has largely focused on the direct relationships between traits and ideological self-placement. There are theoretical reasons, however, to suspect that the relationships between personality traits and political attitudes (1) vary across issue domains and (2) depend on contextual factors that affect the meaning of political stimuli. In this study, we provide an explicit theoretical framework for formulating hypotheses about these differential effects. We then leverage the power of an unusually large national survey of registered voters to examine how the relationships between Big Five personality traits and political attitudes differ across issue domains and social contexts (as defined by racial groups). We confirm some important previous findings regarding personality and political ideology, find clear evidence that Big Five traits affect economic and social attitudes differently, show that the effect of Big Five traits is often as large as that of education or income in predicting ideology, and demonstrate that the relationships between Big Five traits and ideology vary substantially between white and black respondents.

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