Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

PROBLEME DER KÜNFTIGEN ENTWICKLUNG DER KERNSTÄDTE IN DER BUNDESREPUBLIK DEUTSCHLAND UND IHRE BEHANDLUNG IN GEOGRAPHISCHEN UNTERSUCHUNGEN

Dietrich Höllhuber
Geographische Zeitschrift
69. Jahrg., H. 4 (4. QUARTAL 1981), pp. 241-266
Published by: Franz Steiner Verlag
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27818231
Page Count: 26
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($32.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
PROBLEME DER KÜNFTIGEN ENTWICKLUNG DER KERNSTÄDTE IN DER BUNDESREPUBLIK DEUTSCHLAND UND IHRE BEHANDLUNG IN GEOGRAPHISCHEN UNTERSUCHUNGEN
Preview not available

Abstract

Since only a few months the "new housing problem" has been a constant theme of news-media in the Federal Republic of Germany. The problem is anything but new which makes it even more remarkable that geographical research has virtually neglected it up to now. The new housing problem is predominantly one of densely built-up areas dating from pre-war times. There is a rising demand for rented flats in these areas which by a housing market based on private enterprise are rapidly being changed into well-to-do owner-occupied districts. The result of this process is increased social segregation and a growing amount of poorly housed lower income families. This contrasts with increasing numbers of uninhabited flats and houses, due both to speculation and economic recession. Social unrest has been the outcome and 'Instandbesetzung", which means illegal occupation combined with renovation of a dwelling, has become a new word in the german language. The author criticizes contemporary german geographical research as being restricted to pure empiricism and proposes a different approach. This is based on explicit statements of position and values held by the researcher. Instead of elaborate descriptions the development of scenarios, alternative valued models of future (spatial) situations, is proposed. A short preliminary scenario of the german housing market in the late eighties gives an example for this type of approach. In a third part of the paper six shortcomings of geographical research in the Federal Republic of Germany (and in Austria and Switzerland as well) are stated and proposals put forward about the way they are to be overcome. The six points are these: 1. A tendency to oversimplification, to be succeeded by more studies in depth. 2. The preoccupation with description of phenomena, which should be combined with the analysis of values which stand behind them. 3. A superficial objectivity, which is just a means of fencing off demands of society to take sides in a conflict and which should be replaced by an exact methodology combined with clear a statements about aims and values. 4. The elimination of the public sector, which prohibits research into real-world problems. Instead scientific occupation with the input of the public sector into spatial differentiation is advocated. 5. Publication of scientific research is rarely possible without an undue time-lag that prohibits efficient work on urgent problems. Instead a flexible, less costly procedure and more contact with news-media is proposed (this very much against german academic habits). 6. Detachment of scientists hinders recognition of and occupation with real-world-problems as most scientists are of upper middle class extraction. To at least partially overcome this impasse more direct contact with scientific "subjects" is to be considered.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[241]
    [241]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
249
    249
  • Thumbnail: Page 
250
    250
  • Thumbnail: Page 
251
    251
  • Thumbnail: Page 
252
    252
  • Thumbnail: Page 
253
    253
  • Thumbnail: Page 
254
    254
  • Thumbnail: Page 
255
    255
  • Thumbnail: Page 
256
    256
  • Thumbnail: Page 
257
    257
  • Thumbnail: Page 
258
    258
  • Thumbnail: Page 
259
    259
  • Thumbnail: Page 
260
    260
  • Thumbnail: Page 
261
    261
  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266