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Some Dimensions of Altercasting

Eugene A. Weinstein and Paul Deutschberger
Sociometry
Vol. 26, No. 4 (Dec., 1963), pp. 454-466
DOI: 10.2307/2786148
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2786148
Page Count: 13
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Some Dimensions of Altercasting
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Abstract

Altercasting is defined as projecting an identity, to be assumed by other(s) with whom one is in interaction, which is congruent with one's own goals. It is posited as a basic techniques of interpersonal control. Rating scales measuring six dimensions of altercasting are devised and provide the raw data for a pilot investigation of the effects of assigned role and of alter's feedback on the altercasting process. While assigned role is not salient for college subjects, feedback differentials produce a consistent pattern. When confronted with negative and attacking responses, subjects tend to accord alter evaluative superiority at the task at hand and actively place the mantle of responsibility on his shoulders.

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