Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

Ethnic Self-Identity: A Comparison of Ingroup Evaluations

Leo Driedger
Sociometry
Vol. 39, No. 2 (Jun., 1976), pp. 131-141
DOI: 10.2307/2786213
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2786213
Page Count: 11
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Ethnic Self-Identity: A Comparison of Ingroup Evaluations
Preview not available

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to define and explain various expressions of ethnicity by the use of an inventory designed to measure degrees of self-identity with respect to ingroup affirmation, ingroup denial, ideal self-identity, and real self-identity. A comparision of seven Winnipeg ethnic groups in relation to these factors indicated strong ingroup affirmation among the French and the Jews and a low degree of ingroup affirmation among British. Scandinavian and Polish groups. French and Jewish institutional completeness seemed to be mainly responsible for the groups' strong ethnic identification and solidarity. High social status and identification with dominant charter groups appeared to be responsible for the low degree of ethnic denial found among British, Scandinavian and French groups. The results supported Lewin's thesis that individuals need a firm clear sense of identification with an ethnic or majority culture in order to find a secure basis for a sense of well-being.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
131
    131
  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141