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On Affect and Cognition in Politics

Donald Granberg and Thad A. Brown
Social Psychology Quarterly
Vol. 52, No. 3 (Sep., 1989), pp. 171-182
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2786712
Page Count: 12
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On Affect and Cognition in Politics
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Abstract

In four U. S. election studies, affect and cognition were related strongly to direction of voting behavior, but affect appeared to exert the stronger effect. The hypothesis that affect without relevant cognitions is relatively unstable and is less predictive of behavior was supported. Ambivalence among cognitions also was observed to be associated with relatively unstable affect and with a weaker link between affect and behavior.

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