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The Gloried Self: The Aggrandizement and the Constriction of Self

Patricia A. Adler and Peter Adler
Social Psychology Quarterly
Vol. 52, No. 4 (Dec., 1989), pp. 299-310
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2786993
Page Count: 12
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The Gloried Self: The Aggrandizement and the Constriction of Self
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Abstract

This is a study of changes in the selves of college athletes that result from their entry into a world of celebrity and glory. Drawing of five years of participant-observation research with a college basketball team, we discuss athletes' experiences with fame. They undergo concomitant processes of self-aggrandizement and self-diminishment whereby some dimensions of their identities expand and infuse the whole self while others are cast aside or are moved to a more peripheral status. These data cast light on the characteristics of the gloried self, a previously unarticulated form of self-indentity, on the relationship between dramaturgical roles and real selves, and on the process whereby a "master status" is created and attains dominance.

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