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Recombinant Retroviruses That Transduce Individual Polyoma Tumor Antigens: Effects on Growth and Differentiation

Van Cherington, Bill Morgan, Bruce M. Spiegelman and Thomas M. Roberts
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 83, No. 12 (Jun. 15, 1986), pp. 4307-4311
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27967
Page Count: 5
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Recombinant Retroviruses That Transduce Individual Polyoma Tumor Antigens: Effects on Growth and Differentiation
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Abstract

We have constructed infectious retroviral vectors, derived from Moloney murine leukemia virus, that efficiently transduce the polyoma virus tumor (T) antigens individually. The parental vector we have chosen [pZIPNeoSV(X)1] expresses a dominant selectable marker for neomycin resistance and is a shuttle vector capable of propagation in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, thus facilitating its use in structure-function studies. To address the relationship between polyoma T-antigen tumorigenesis and the effects of individual T antigens on growth control and differentiation, we used these vectors to introduce and stably express large, middle-sized, or small T antigens into mouse fibroblasts and preadipocytes. All cDNAs introduced into the vector are expressed stably even in the absence of selective pressure. The stable expression of small T antigen is noted particularly because cell lines expressing small T antigen have not been readily available prior to the use of retroviral vectors. Small T antigen-induced increase in saturation density of NIH 3T3 cells can be scored on the basis of the morphology of drug-resistant colonies. Middle-sized T antigen eliminates the growth requirement of NIH 3T3 cells for epidermal growth factor in a defined medium and permits growth in platelet-poor plasma, indicating elimination of the platelet-derived growth factor requirement as well. Large T antigen suppresses mouse preadipocyte (3T3-F442A) differentiation. These vectors and these functional assays of T-antigen activity permit genetic analysis of the relationship between tumorigenesis by T antigens and the alteration of cellular growth and differentiation.

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