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Expedited Drug Case Management Programs: Some Lessons in Case Management Reform

Joan E. Jacoby
The Justice System Journal
Vol. 17, No. 1, Swift and Effective Justice: New Approaches to Drug Cases in the States (1994), pp. 19-40
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27976841
Page Count: 22
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Expedited Drug Case Management Programs: Some Lessons in Case Management Reform
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Abstract

The implementation of Expedited Drug Case Management (EDCM) and their progenitors, Differentiated Case Management (DCM) programs, have profoundly affected how courts view case management. By aligning the work of the court, prosecutor, and public defender to meet the realities of case dispositions, workloads in the courts have been significantly reduced, and scarce jail beds have been saved. The process of change is not easy, however. If affects policy, management, and operations; but the benefits may be substantial. The lessons learned from implementing change based on the evaluation of EDCM programs is the subject of this article.

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