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Problem-Solving Courts: Models and Trends

Pamela M. Casey and David B. Rottman
The Justice System Journal
Vol. 26, No. 1 (2005), pp. 35-56
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27977213
Page Count: 22
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Problem-Solving Courts: Models and Trends
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Abstract

In 2004, the Conference of Chief Justices and the Conference of State Court Administrators reaffirmed their commitment to advance the study, evaluation, and integration of problem-solving methods and principles into the administration of justice. This article describes four of the most prominent American problem-solving court models in terms of their origins, key practices, variety, and success to date, noting specific features or issues that are distinctive to each model. It concludes with twelve trends that provide insight into where these courts now stand and appear to be headed in the future.

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