Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Study of the Spatial Aspects of Partner Choice from a Human Biological Viewpoint

D. A. Coleman
Man
New Series, Vol. 14, No. 3 (Sep., 1979), pp. 414-435
DOI: 10.2307/2801867
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2801867
Page Count: 22
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($20.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Study of the Spatial Aspects of Partner Choice from a Human Biological Viewpoint
Preview not available

Abstract

This article considers geographical and social aspects of marital choice in modern Britain and their likely genetical import. Marital choice is important biologically because partners with remote origins tend to be genetically more different than those with close origins. Proximity of partners affects genetical variance and the size and ease of definition of breeding populations. Most previous studies have concentrated upon village populations, but modern urban marriage also needs to be studied, especially since a high proportion of the world's population now lives in cities. A nationwide British survey showed that marriage up to the late 1950s was still relatively local. Differences in regional origin, social class and age all affect marital distance (and geographers' models of spatial interaction are a useful model for the large scale aspects of marital mobility). A later regional survey showed some subdivision of the chosen city through marital contacts; although the degree of isolation was not great. Migration matrix models show that all the components of the region would become ancestrally homogeneous with the outside world after seven generations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[414]
    [414]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
415
    415
  • Thumbnail: Page 
416
    416
  • Thumbnail: Page 
417
    417
  • Thumbnail: Page 
418
    418
  • Thumbnail: Page 
419
    419
  • Thumbnail: Page 
420
    420
  • Thumbnail: Page 
421
    421
  • Thumbnail: Page 
422
    422
  • Thumbnail: Page 
423
    423
  • Thumbnail: Page 
424
    424
  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425
  • Thumbnail: Page 
426
    426
  • Thumbnail: Page 
427
    427
  • Thumbnail: Page 
428
    428
  • Thumbnail: Page 
429
    429
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[430]
    [430]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
431
    431
  • Thumbnail: Page 
432
    432
  • Thumbnail: Page 
433
    433
  • Thumbnail: Page 
434
    434
  • Thumbnail: Page 
435
    435