Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Gender and Ritual in an Islamic Society: The Berti of Darfur

Ladislav Holy
Man
New Series, Vol. 23, No. 3 (Sep., 1988), pp. 469-487
DOI: 10.2307/2803261
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2803261
Page Count: 19

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Religious rituals, Men, Milk, Children, Islam, Rituals, Butter, Women, Symbolism, Millet
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($20.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Gender and Ritual in an Islamic Society: The Berti of Darfur
Preview not available

Abstract

The article is concerned with the events which the Berti of Northern Darfur classify as `awaid (sg. `ada; customs, custom) and which can be glossed as customary rituals. It is informed by the assumption that their proper understanding requires a grasp of the Berti system of symbolic classification as well as the analysis of the symbols which the rituals employ, for through their symbolic structure they reflect a different set of notions from those expressed through practices which are classified as din (religion) and are locally understood as properly Islamic. The customary rituals are more distinctly the concern of women than men whereas the religious rituals are predominantly male affairs. These two classes of rituals thus obviously express certain views of men and women and say something about the relations between them. In spite of the fact that they differ significantly in what they express, most Berti do not see them as mutually incompatible or contradictory. Their easy coexistence within the encompassing system of notions constituting the contemporary Berti culture derives from the fact that what the Berti understand as Islamic orthodoxy, does not alone reflect adequately their commonsense knowledge of the interdependence of men and women.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[469]
    [469]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
470
    470
  • Thumbnail: Page 
471
    471
  • Thumbnail: Page 
472
    472
  • Thumbnail: Page 
473
    473
  • Thumbnail: Page 
474
    474
  • Thumbnail: Page 
475
    475
  • Thumbnail: Page 
476
    476
  • Thumbnail: Page 
477
    477
  • Thumbnail: Page 
478
    478
  • Thumbnail: Page 
479
    479
  • Thumbnail: Page 
480
    480
  • Thumbnail: Page 
481
    481
  • Thumbnail: Page 
482
    482
  • Thumbnail: Page 
483
    483
  • Thumbnail: Page 
484
    484
  • Thumbnail: Page 
485
    485
  • Thumbnail: Page 
486
    486
  • Thumbnail: Page 
487
    487