Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Systematic Implications of Flavonoid Pigments in the Fern Genus Hemionitis (Adiantiaceae)

David E. Giannasi and John T. Mickel
Brittonia
Vol. 31, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1979), pp. 405-412
Published by: Springer on behalf of the New York Botanical Garden Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2806135
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Systematic Implications of Flavonoid Pigments in the Fern Genus Hemionitis (Adiantiaceae)
Preview not available

Abstract

The closely related fern genera Hemionitis L. and Gymnopteris Bernhardi are separated primarily on differences in leaf architecture and venation. Studies indicate that these characters are highly variable and unreliably diagnostic. Further, the type species of the two genera readily hybridize with each other. Spore morphology, as exhibited by SEM, does not support the traditional alignment of the species in these two genera: some species of hemionitis and Gymnopteris have the same rugose to papillate spores, while other species from both genera possess crested spores. The flavonoid chemistry of these taxa coinciedes with spore type, i.e., taxa from both genera which possess crested spores produce kaempferol and quercetin 3-0-glycosides, while species with tuberculate spores produce only quercetin 3,4 -0-glycosides. The spore and chemical data suggest a realignment of these taxa within a single genus, which would avoid the rather tenuous dependence on a single vegetative character for generic distinctions.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[405]
    [405]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
406
    406
  • Thumbnail: Page 
407
    407
  • Thumbnail: Page 
408
    408
  • Thumbnail: Page 
409
    409
  • Thumbnail: Page 
410
    410
  • Thumbnail: Page 
411
    411
  • Thumbnail: Page 
412
    412