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If an Orange Falls in the Forest, is It Eligible? A Comment on Tainter and Lucas

Thomas F. King
American Antiquity
Vol. 50, No. 1 (Jan., 1985), pp. 170-172
DOI: 10.2307/280646
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/280646
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
If an Orange Falls in the Forest, is It Eligible? A Comment on Tainter and Lucas
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Abstract

Tainter and Lucas (1983) have given us a cogent and useful critique of the "significance concept" that is a fundamental part of historic preservation and "conservation archeology" as practiced in the United States. I have no real disagreement with their arguments or with their conclusions, although I am not sure they can be operationalized.

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