Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Infant Abandonment and Adoption in China

Kay Johnson, Huang Banghan and Wang Liyao
Population and Development Review
Vol. 24, No. 3 (Sep., 1998), pp. 469-510
Published by: Population Council
DOI: 10.2307/2808152
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2808152
Page Count: 42
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($16.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Infant Abandonment and Adoption in China
Preview not available

Abstract

This article reports the findings of a research project conducted in 1995-96 on infant abandonment and adoption in China. These two practices were found to be closely linked. Restrictive birth planning policies combined with parents' perceived need for a son produce patterns of abandonment that primarily affect higher-parity daughters in sonless families. A lesser, but nonetheless strong desire for daughters among daughterless families leads to adoption as a means to remedy this situation as well as a means to overcome childlessness. These aspects of contemporary Chinese culture-the desire for daughters and the willingness to adopt unrelated children as a method of family construction-have helped alleviate the ill effects of increased infant abandonment in the 1980s and 1990s by leading many families to adopt foundlings. Because government laws and regulations discriminate in various ways against foundlings and over-quota children, and punish the parents who raise them, much of this popular solution to a difficult social problem has taken place outside of official channels and institutions. There is hope that legal changes may soon alter this situation.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
469
    469
  • Thumbnail: Page 
470
    470
  • Thumbnail: Page 
471
    471
  • Thumbnail: Page 
472
    472
  • Thumbnail: Page 
473
    473
  • Thumbnail: Page 
474
    474
  • Thumbnail: Page 
475
    475
  • Thumbnail: Page 
476
    476
  • Thumbnail: Page 
477
    477
  • Thumbnail: Page 
478
    478
  • Thumbnail: Page 
479
    479
  • Thumbnail: Page 
480
    480
  • Thumbnail: Page 
481
    481
  • Thumbnail: Page 
482
    482
  • Thumbnail: Page 
483
    483
  • Thumbnail: Page 
484
    484
  • Thumbnail: Page 
485
    485
  • Thumbnail: Page 
486
    486
  • Thumbnail: Page 
487
    487
  • Thumbnail: Page 
488
    488
  • Thumbnail: Page 
489
    489
  • Thumbnail: Page 
490
    490
  • Thumbnail: Page 
491
    491
  • Thumbnail: Page 
492
    492
  • Thumbnail: Page 
493
    493
  • Thumbnail: Page 
494
    494
  • Thumbnail: Page 
495
    495
  • Thumbnail: Page 
496
    496
  • Thumbnail: Page 
497
    497
  • Thumbnail: Page 
498
    498
  • Thumbnail: Page 
499
    499
  • Thumbnail: Page 
500
    500
  • Thumbnail: Page 
501
    501
  • Thumbnail: Page 
502
    502
  • Thumbnail: Page 
503
    503
  • Thumbnail: Page 
504
    504
  • Thumbnail: Page 
505
    505
  • Thumbnail: Page 
506
    506
  • Thumbnail: Page 
507
    507
  • Thumbnail: Page 
508
    508
  • Thumbnail: Page 
509
    509
  • Thumbnail: Page 
510
    510