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Hunting Hoppers

David B. Madsen and James E. Kirkman
American Antiquity
Vol. 53, No. 3 (Jul., 1988), pp. 593-604
DOI: 10.2307/281220
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/281220
Page Count: 12
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Hunting Hoppers
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Abstract

Lakeside Cave deposits spanning the last 5,000 years contain evidence of grasshopper (Melanoplus sanguinipes) use. Abundant ethnographic/ethnohistoric data suggest the widespread use of hoppers and other insects. Procurement strategies may be unique to the Great Salt Lake area. During the summer, salted and sun-dried hoppers are washed up on beaches and form windrows up to .2m× 1.5m× 15km Hoppers produce over 3,010 kcal/ kg, and return rates average 272,649 kcal/hour. Digestible proportions have not been determined, but even at a return rate well below the experimental value, optimality models suggest hopper collection should be favored over all other collected resources.

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