If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Prehistoric Macaw Breeding in the North American Southwest

Paul E. Minnis, Michael E. Whalen, Jane H. Kelley and Joe D. Stewart
American Antiquity
Vol. 58, No. 2 (Apr., 1993), pp. 270-276
DOI: 10.2307/281969
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/281969
Page Count: 7
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Prehistoric Macaw Breeding in the North American Southwest
Preview not available

Abstract

The scarlet macaw (Ara macao) was an important prehistoric trade item in northern Mexico and southwestern United States. Paquime (or Casas Grandes) in northwestern Chihuahua has been assumed to have dominated or even monopolized the macaw trade. This conclusion is a result of the fact that Paquime is the only site with evidence of substantial macaw-breeding facilities. Two recent archaeological projects in Chihuahua indicate that macaw production was not limited to Casas Grandes. Furthermore, the political relations of production for these ritually and economically important birds differed depending on whether or not the producers were part of the complex polity centered at Casas Grandes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
275
    275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
276
    276