If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Midwater Zooplankton Communities on Pelagic Detritus (Giant Larvacean Houses) in Monterey Bay, California

Deborah K. Steinberg, Mary W. Silver, Cynthia H. Pilskaln, Susan L. Coale and Jennifer B. Paduan
Limnology and Oceanography
Vol. 39, No. 7 (Nov., 1994), pp. 1606-1620
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2838197
Page Count: 15
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Midwater Zooplankton Communities on Pelagic Detritus (Giant Larvacean Houses) in Monterey Bay, California
Preview not available

Abstract

The mucus feeding structure or "houses" of the giant larvacean Bathochordaeus provide abundant material for the study of deep-sea detrital communities, particularly their poorly known zooplankton associates. We sampled houses between 100 and 500 m in Monterey Bay with a submersible ROV (remotely operated vehicle) and surveyed houses for metazoans by database search of tideo footage taken from the ROV. Up to an order of magnitude more metazoans were found on houses than in surrounding waters. On average, copepods constituted as much as 96% of the assemblage on houses, and many of the species possess benthiclike morphology and feeding strategies. Poecilostomatoid copepods (genus Oncaea) averaged as many as $64.6 house^-1$, and scarcely known calanoid copepods (genus Scopalatum) occurred in 56% of the samples. Higher numbers of metazoans occurred on shallower houses (100-300 m), likely due to a difference in the species of larvacean present and (or) to reduce oxygen levels at greater depths. At least one copepod species, Scopalatum vorax, occurred on houses more frequently during the non-upwelling season, possibly due to the lack of other food. Our results suggest that midwater detritus contains a unique invertebrate community that has been largely undetected, mostly due to sampling difficulties. The houses also provide benthiclike habitats for midwater zooplankton and serve as feeding centers. These particle-associated zooplankton may therefore contribute to remineralization of particulate organic carbon at depth.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1606
    1606
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1607
    1607
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1608
    1608
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1609
    1609
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1610
    1610
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1611
    1611
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1612
    1612
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1613
    1613
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1614
    1614
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1615
    1615
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1616
    1616
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1617
    1617
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1618
    1618
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1619
    1619
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1620
    1620