Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Rare Earth Element Geochemistry of Mono Lake Water and the Importance of Carbonate Complexing

Kevin H. Johannesson and W. Berry Lyons
Limnology and Oceanography
Vol. 39, No. 5 (Jul., 1994), pp. 1141-1154
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2838478
Page Count: 14
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Rare Earth Element Geochemistry of Mono Lake Water and the Importance of Carbonate Complexing
Preview not available

Abstract

Rare earth element (REE) concentrations for the alkaline, saline waters of Mono Lake in eastern California are reported. The total REE concentrations of te lake water ranged from 4,681 to 7,979 pmol $kg^-1$. Shale-normalized REE profiles for the lake water indicate that the heavy REEs (HREE) are enriched 20-200 times over the light REEs (LREE) compared to shale. The speciation of the REEs in Mono Lake was modeled with a combined specific ion interaction and ion-pairing model which allowed activity coefficients for the major solutes $(\Upsilon_M$, $\Upsilon_X)$, the REEs $(\Upsilon_M)$, and the REEs ion pairs $(\Upsilon_MX)$ to be determined in the high ionic strength lake waters (I=1.84 m). The speciation model suggests that essentially all the REEs in solution are complexed with carbonate ions and that >99% of each REE is complexed as $Ln(CO_3)_2-species$. The carbonate ion concentration of Mono Lake water is 0.27 m. Stability constants for these complexes increase with atomic number; consequently, these complexes are responsible for the HREE enrichments. Activity product calculations for REEs phosphate coprecipitates in the high phosphate waters of Mono Lake (i.e. 800-1,000 $\mumol kg^-1$). indicate that the lake water is close to saturation with respect to these precipitates and suggest that the coprecipitates may effectively limit the maximum dissolved REE concentrations in the lake.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1141
    1141
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1142
    1142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1143
    1143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1144
    1144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1145
    1145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1146
    1146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1147
    1147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1148
    1148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1149
    1149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1150
    1150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1151
    1151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1152
    1152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1153
    1153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1154
    1154