Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Lakes as Islands: Biogeographic Distribution, Turnover Rates, and Species Composition in the Lakes of Central New York

Robert A. Browne
Journal of Biogeography
Vol. 8, No. 1 (Jan., 1981), pp. 75-83
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/2844594
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2844594
Page Count: 9
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Lakes as Islands: Biogeographic Distribution, Turnover Rates, and Species Composition in the Lakes of Central New York
Preview not available

Abstract

The principles of island biogeographic theory are applied to the species diversity and distribution of various taxa within lakes of central New York state. Greater emphasis is placed on mollusc species, owing to the extensiveness of surveys, but data for zooplankton and fish species are also presented. Species diversity was found to correlate positively with lake surface area, with best descriptive equations being power curve functions. z-values of 0.23, 0.17 and 0.24 were found respectively for mollusc, zooplankton, and fish species-area equations. Species turnover rates over a half-century interval were calculated to be 0.50%/year for molluscs in a large lake, and 0.28%/year for the zooplankton communities of twelve lakes. Zooplankton turnover rates were negatively correlated with lake surface area and initial species number.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83