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Relevance of the Equilibrium Theory of Island Biogeography and Species-Area Relations to Conservation with a Case from Amazonia

B. L. Zimmerman and R. O. Bierregaard
Journal of Biogeography
Vol. 13, No. 2 (Mar., 1986), pp. 133-143
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/2844988
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2844988
Page Count: 11
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Relevance of the Equilibrium Theory of Island Biogeography and Species-Area Relations to Conservation with a Case from Amazonia
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Abstract

The equilibrium theory of island biogeography and associated species-area relations have been promoted as theoretical bases for design of nature reserves. However, the theory has not been properly validated and the practical value of biogeographic principles for conservation remains unknown. Recent studies have shown that species-area data in the absence of autecological bases provide no special insights relevant to conservation. The unreliability of simplistic species-area data when applied to real conservation situations is illustrated with an example from the Brazilian Amazon. A prediction of area for the conservation of species of central Amazonian forest frogs was made from species-area data and found to lack relevance in light of autecological evidence.

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