Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

A Climatic Model for Location of Plant Species in Florida, U.S.A.

Elgene O. Box, David W. Crumpacker and E. Dennis Hardin
Journal of Biogeography
Vol. 20, No. 6 (Nov., 1993), pp. 629-644
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/2845519
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2845519
Page Count: 16
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Preview not available

Abstract

A climatic-envelope model for 125 woody plant species native to Florida was built using data from site floristic lists, species range maps and log-term climatic records for 106 meteorological stations. The model predicts that a species will occur at a site as long as none of the species' climatic limits is exceeded by the local climatic data. The model was tested for its ability to predict species lists for two different sets of sites and for species ranges (i.e. sites lists for various species). Median prediction sucess for these tests varied from 85% to 88% (from 96% to 100% for predictions accurate to within 100 km of range-map distance). This supports the hypothesis that climatic factors, especially winter temperatures, exert important direct and/or indirect control over the natural distribution of woody species in Florida, despite pervasive variations in substrate. The model should be useful for studying climatic factors that may limit species ranges in Florida, as well as potential changes in ranges of species after moderate climate change. Until actual range limitation mechanisms are better known, there may be no practical alternative to simple envelope models for simultaneously treating large numbers of plant taxa and sites. Furthermore, even at local scales, where substrate, topography, fire, competition and other factors become more important, there may be no present alternative to purely climate-based models as a first step in the geographic study of plant-environment relationships.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
629
    629
  • Thumbnail: Page 
630
    630
  • Thumbnail: Page 
631
    631
  • Thumbnail: Page 
632
    632
  • Thumbnail: Page 
633
    633
  • Thumbnail: Page 
634
    634
  • Thumbnail: Page 
635
    635
  • Thumbnail: Page 
636
    636
  • Thumbnail: Page 
637
    637
  • Thumbnail: Page 
638
    638
  • Thumbnail: Page 
639
    639
  • Thumbnail: Page 
640
    640
  • Thumbnail: Page 
641
    641
  • Thumbnail: Page 
642
    642
  • Thumbnail: Page 
643
    643
  • Thumbnail: Page 
644
    644