Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

Pine Invasions in the Southern Hemisphere: Determinants of Spread and Invadability

D. M. Richardson, P. A. Williams and R. J. Hobbs
Journal of Biogeography
Vol. 21, No. 5 (Sep., 1994), pp. 511-527
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/2845655
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2845655
Page Count: 17
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Pine Invasions in the Southern Hemisphere: Determinants of Spread and Invadability
Preview not available

Abstract

Many factors interact to determine whether an introduced organism will become invasive. The widespread planting of many Pinus species at various densities and in many habitats at different times in the Southern Hemisphere (well outside their natural range) provides a unique opportunity to identify the determinants of invasive success for a large group of related organisms. At least sixteen pine species have spread from planting sites to invade natural or semi-natural vegetation. Species with adventive populations over fairly large areas are P. contorta Dougl., P. halepensis Mill., P. patula Schiede & Deppe, P. pinaster Ait., P. ponderosa Laws., P. radiata D. Don and P. sylvestris L. This paper explores the biological profiles of successful invaders, the inherent and induced susceptibility of different vegetation types to invasion, patterns of invasion, the role of disturbance in initiating and sustaining invasions, the role of time, and the various functions of the resident biota in the receiving habitat in mediating the outcome of an introduction. This information, with evidence from contemporary studies of pine dynamics in the Northern Hemisphere and reconstructions of pine migrations in the early Holocene, shows that: (1) Most of the important invaders share a suite of biological traits that facilitate long-distance dispersal by wind, and allow invading populations to persist in habitats subjected to frequent disturbance. (2) The extent of invasion for widely planted species is positively correlated with the residence period. (3) Ground-cover categories can be ranked according to their vulnerability to invasion as follows: forest < shrubland < grassland << dunes < bare ground. (4) Distribance regimes and the resident biota have a marked (and complex) influence on invadability. This information is used to predict future trends in pine invasions.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
511
    511
  • Thumbnail: Page 
512
    512
  • Thumbnail: Page 
513
    513
  • Thumbnail: Page 
514
    514
  • Thumbnail: Page 
515
    515
  • Thumbnail: Page 
516
    516
  • Thumbnail: Page 
517
    517
  • Thumbnail: Page 
518
    518
  • Thumbnail: Page 
519
    519
  • Thumbnail: Page 
520
    520
  • Thumbnail: Page 
521
    521
  • Thumbnail: Page 
522
    522
  • Thumbnail: Page 
523
    523
  • Thumbnail: Page 
524
    524
  • Thumbnail: Page 
525
    525
  • Thumbnail: Page 
526
    526
  • Thumbnail: Page 
527
    527
Part of Sustainability