Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Global Primary Production: A Remote Sensing Approach

Stephen D. Prince and Samuel N. Goward
Journal of Biogeography
Vol. 22, No. 4/5, Terrestrial Ecosystem Interactions with Global Change, Volume 2 (Jul. - Sep., 1995), pp. 815-835
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/2845983
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2845983
Page Count: 21
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Global Primary Production: A Remote Sensing Approach
Preview not available

Abstract

A new model of global primary production (GLObal Production Efficiency Model, GLO-PEM), based on the production efficiency concept, is decribed. GLO-PEM is the first attempt to model both global net and gross primary production using the production efficiency approach and is unique in that it uses satellite data to measure both absorption of photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) and also the environmrntal variables that affect the utilization of APAR in primary production. The use of satellite measurements gives global, repetitive, spatially contiguous and time specific observations of the actual vegetation. GLO-PEM is based on physiological principles, in particular the amount of carbon fixed per unit absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (ε) is modelled rather than fitted using field observations. GLO-PEM is illustrated with the first available year (1987) of the 8× 8 km resolution NOAA/NASA AVHRR land Pathfinder data set. The global net primary production, respiration and ε values obtained indicate that even the rather simple AVHRR provides a wealth of information relevant to biospheric monitoring. The algorithms and results presented indicate that there are significant possibilities of inferring biological and environmental variables using multispectral techniques that need to be explored if the new generation of satellite remote sensing systems is to be exploited productively.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
815
    815
  • Thumbnail: Page 
816
    816
  • Thumbnail: Page 
817
    817
  • Thumbnail: Page 
818
    818
  • Thumbnail: Page 
819
    819
  • Thumbnail: Page 
820
    820
  • Thumbnail: Page 
821
    821
  • Thumbnail: Page 
822
    822
  • Thumbnail: Page 
823
    823
  • Thumbnail: Page 
824
    824
  • Thumbnail: Page 
825
    825
  • Thumbnail: Page 
826
    826
  • Thumbnail: Page 
827
    827
  • Thumbnail: Page 
828
    828
  • Thumbnail: Page 
829
    829
  • Thumbnail: Page 
830
    830
  • Thumbnail: Page 
831
    831
  • Thumbnail: Page 
832
    832
  • Thumbnail: Page 
833
    833
  • Thumbnail: Page 
834
    834
  • Thumbnail: Page 
835
    835