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The Chemical Nature of Buckminsterfullerene (C$_60$) and the Characterization of a Platinum Derivative

Paul J. Fagan, Joseph C. Calabrese and Brian Malone
Science
New Series, Vol. 252, No. 5009 (May 24, 1991), pp. 1160-1161
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2876290
Page Count: 2
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Abstract

Little is known about the chemical nature of the recently isolated carbon clusters (C$_{60}$, C$_{70}$, C$_{84}$, and so forth). One potential application of these materials is as highly dispersed supports for metal catalysts, and therefore the question of how metal atoms bind to C$_{60}$ is of interest. Reaction of C$_{60}$ with organometallic ruthenium and platinum reagents has shown that metals can be attached directly to the carbon framework. The native geometry of C$_{60}$ is almost ideally constructed for dihapto- bonding to a transition metal, and an x-ray diffraction analysis of the platinum complex [(C$_6$H$_5$)$_3$P]$_2$Pt($\eta^2$-C$_{60}$).C$_4$H$_8$O revealed a structure similar to that known for [(C$_6$H$_5$)$_3$P]$_2$Pt($\eta^2$-ethylene). The reactivity of C$_{60}$ is not like that of relatively electron-rich planar aromatic molecules such as benzene. The carbon-carbon double bonds of C$_{60}$ react like those of very electron-deficient arenes and alkenes.

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