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A Morbillivirus That Caused Fatal Disease in Horses and Humans

Keith Murray, Paul Selleck, Peter Hooper, Alex Hyatt, Allan Gould, Laurie Gleeson, Harvey Westbury, Lester Hiley, Linda Selvey, Barry Rodwell and Peter Ketterer
Science
New Series, Vol. 268, No. 5207 (Apr. 7, 1995), pp. 94-97
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2886501
Page Count: 4
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Abstract

A morbillivirus has been isolated and added to an increasing list of emerging viral diseases. This virus caused an outbreak of fatal respiratory disease in horses and humans. Genetic analyses show it to be only distantly related to the classic morbilliviruses rinderpest, measles, and canine distemper. When seen by electron microscopy, viruses had 10- and 18-nanometer surface projections that gave them a "double-fringed" appearance. The virus induced syncytia that developed in the endothelium of blood vessels, particularly the lungs.

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