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Sex Differences in Mental Test Scores, Variability, and Numbers of High-Scoring Individuals

Larry V. Hedges and Amy Nowell
Science
New Series, Vol. 269, No. 5220 (Jul. 7, 1995), pp. 41-45
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2889145
Page Count: 5
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Sex Differences in Mental Test Scores, Variability, and Numbers of High-Scoring Individuals
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Abstract

Sex differences in central tendency, variability, and numbers of high scores on mental tests have been extensively studied. Research has not always seemed to yield consistent results, partly because most studies have not used representative samples of national populations. An analysis of mental test scores from six studies that used national probability samples provided evidence that although average sex differences have been generally small and stable over time, the test scores of males consistently have larger variance. Except in tests of reading comprehension, perceptual speed, and associative memory, males typically outnumber females substantially among high-scoring individuals.

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