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Human Appropriation of Renewable Fresh Water

Sandra L. Postel, Gretchen C. Daily and Paul R. Ehrlich
Science
New Series, Vol. 271, No. 5250 (Feb. 9, 1996), pp. 785-788
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2889886
Page Count: 4
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Human Appropriation of Renewable Fresh Water
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Abstract

Humanity now uses 26 percent of total terrestrial evapotranspiration and 54 percent of runoff that is geographically and temporally accessible. Increased use of evapotranspiration will confer minimal benefits globally because most land suitable for rain-fed agriculture is already in production. New dam construction could increase accessible runoff by about 10 percent over the next 30 years, whereas population is projected to increase by more than 45 percent during that period.

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