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The Instructive Role of Innate Immunity in the Acquired Immune Response

Douglas T. Fearon and Richard M. Locksley
Science
New Series, Vol. 272, No. 5258 (Apr. 5, 1996), pp. 50-54
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2890770
Page Count: 5
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The Instructive Role of Innate Immunity in the Acquired Immune Response
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Abstract

Innate immunity has been considered only to provide rapid, incomplete antimicrobial host defense until the slower, more definitive acquired immune response develops. However, innate immunity may have an additional role in determining which antigens the acquired immune system responds to and the nature of that response. Knowledge of the molecules and pathways involved may create new therapeutic options for infectious and autoimmune diseases.

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