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Geographic Distribution of Endangered Species in the United States

A. P. Dobson, J. P. Rodriguez, W. M. Roberts and D. S. Wilcove
Science
New Series, Vol. 275, No. 5299 (Jan. 24, 1997), pp. 550-553
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2891811
Page Count: 4
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Geographic Distribution of Endangered Species in the United States
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Abstract

Geographic distribution data for endangered species in the United States were used to locate "hot spots" of threatened biodiversity. The hot spots for different species groups rarely overlap, except where anthropogenic activities reduce natural habitat in centers of endernism. Conserving endangered plant species maximizes the incidental protection of all other species groups. The presence of endangered birds and herptiles, however, provides a more sensitive indication of overall endangered biodiversity within any region. The amount of land that needs to be managed to protect currently endangered and threatened species in the United States is a relatively small proportion of the land mass.

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