Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Synergistic Predation, Density Dependence, and Population Regulation in Marine Fish

Mark A. Hixon and Mark H. Carr
Science
New Series, Vol. 277, No. 5328 (Aug. 15, 1997), pp. 946-949
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2892910
Page Count: 4
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Synergistic Predation, Density Dependence, and Population Regulation in Marine Fish
Preview not available

Abstract

Understanding natural causes of density dependence is essential for identifying possible sources of population regulation. Field experiments on a model system of coral reef fishes showed that small juveniles of Chromis cyanea suffer heavy mortality that is spatially density-dependent only in the presence of two suites of predators: transient piscivores attacking from above, and reef-resident piscivores attacking from below. In the absence of either kind of predator, early mortality of Chromis is virtually density-independent. Because piscivores may have regulatory roles in this and similar marine systems, overfishing these predators may have ramifications for the remainder of the exploited community.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
946
    946
  • Thumbnail: Page 
947
    947
  • Thumbnail: Page 
948
    948
  • Thumbnail: Page 
949
    949