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Journal Article

Phytochromes and Cryptochromes in the Entrainment of the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock

David E. Somers, Paul F. Devlin and Steve A. Kay
Science
New Series, Vol. 282, No. 5393 (Nov. 20, 1998), pp. 1488-1490
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2897077
Page Count: 3

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Topics: Fluence, Seedlings, Photoreceptors, Plants, Plant cells, Oscillators, Chromium, Luminescence
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Phytochromes and Cryptochromes in the Entrainment of the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock
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Abstract

Circadian clocks are synchronized by environmental cues such as light. Photoreceptor-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutants were used to measure the effect of light fluence rate on circadian period in plants. Phytochrome B is the primary high-intensity red light photoreceptor for circadian control, and phytochrome A acts under low-intensity red light. Cryptochrome 1 and phytochrome A both act to transmit low-fluence blue light to the clock. Cryptochrome 1 mediates high-intensity blue light signals for period length control. The presence of cryptochromes in both plants and animals suggests that circadian input pathways have been conserved throughout evolution.

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