Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Growth Layers in Dental Cement for Determining the Age of Red Deer (Cervus elaphus L.)

Brian Mitchell
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jun., 1967), pp. 279-293
DOI: 10.2307/2912
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2912
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Growth Layers in Dental Cement for Determining the Age of Red Deer (Cervus elaphus L.)
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Growth layers in dental cement of red deer (Cervus elaphus L.) were studied in samples of material from both sexes, taken throughout the year in various parts of Scotland, and from a limited amount of known-age material (twenty-two animals of which only two were older than 3.5 years). 2. The lower first molar, the first permanent tooth, was the most convenient to use and it was sectioned to expose the layers in the cement pad (under the crown) for viewing by reflected light under a low-power binocular dissecting microscope. 3. Cement comprises broad layers rich in cementocytes, associated with the summer/autumn period of growth, separated by narrower layers deficient in cementocytes, corresponding with the period of winter/early spring food restriction. Some stags also showed a narrow winter-like layer corresponding with the mating season (rutting layers). 4. Seasonal changes in body condition due to changes in diet appear the best explanation for the annual pattern of cement growth, but other factors may be involved. 5. The number of broad white (cementocyte rich) layers found in first molar cement pads mostly gives the correct age in years. Other teeth can also give the age using a correction factor appropriate to each. The present results indicate that the method may be less effective with animals showing irregular or less seasonal variations in growth.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
279
    279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
280
    280
  • Thumbnail: Page 
281
    281
  • Thumbnail: Page 
282
    282
  • Thumbnail: Page 
283
    283
  • Thumbnail: Page 
284
    284
  • Thumbnail: Page 
285
    285
  • Thumbnail: Page 
286
    286
  • Thumbnail: Page 
287
    287
  • Thumbnail: Page 
288
    288
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
289
    289
  • Thumbnail: Page 
290
    290
  • Thumbnail: Page 
291
    291
  • Thumbnail: Page 
292
    292
  • Thumbnail: Page 
293
    293